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Meet Us – Cancer Nanotechnology Training Centers (CNTCs)

  Bradley D. Anderson, Ph.D. Andrew Kummel, Ph.D.
  Rashid Bashir, Ph.D. Hai-Quan Mao, Ph.D.
  Abhaya Datye, Ph.D. Robert Mattrey, M.D.
  B. Mark Evers, M.D. Ann M. Nardulli, Ph.D.
  Douglas Faller, M.D., Ph.D. Janet M. Oliver, Ph.D.
  Bennett B. Goldberg, Ph.D. Denis Wirtz, Ph.D.

 

Bradley D. Anderson, Ph.D.
H.B. Kostenbauder Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences
University of Kentucky

Bradley D. Anderson, Ph.D.

Bradley D. Anderson, Ph.D., is the H.B. Kostenbauder Professor in Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky and co-Program Director/MPI for the University of Kentucky Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center. Dr. Anderson was a research scientist at The Upjohn Company for five years prior to joining the University of Utah in 1983 as an Associate Professor in Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry. In 2000, he relocated to the University of Kentucky where he served as Chair of Pharmaceutical Sciences until 2003. He is currently Director of the Division of Drug Development in the College of Pharmacy. He is a Charter Member of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) and an AAPS Fellow. In 1985, Dr. Anderson received the Pfizer Young Investigator Award (1985).

Dr. Anderson has received several awards, including the Meritorious Manuscript Award from Pharmaceutical Research (1990), the Outstanding Paper Award in the Journal of Controlled Release (1992), the Ebert Prize for the best paper in Journal of Pharmaceutical Science (1998), and the University of Utah Distinguished Research Award (1999). Dr. Anderson serves on several editorial advisory boards and is an Associate Editor for Journal of Pharmaceutical. He has been a National Cancer Institute-funded Principal or co-Investigator continuously since 1985. He holds several patents in prodrug design and drug delivery system design. He has approximately 130 publications in drug solubilization and stabilization, prodrug design and drug targeting for the treatment of cancer and AIDS, lipid bilayer transport and liposomal drug delivery, and computational methods for predicting membrane transport and drug formulation properties. His current research interests include controlled drug-delivery to solid tumors using nanotechnology, chemical stability in amorphous solid-state formulations, and molecular dynamics simulations to explore the properties of drugs in amorphous formulations.

Dr. Anderson received his M.S. and Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Chemistry (1978) from the University of Kansas.

 

Rashid Bashir, Ph.D.
Abel Bliss Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering & Bioengineering
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Rashid Bashir, Ph.D.

Rashid Bashir, Ph.D., is the Abel Bliss Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering & Bioengineering and Director of the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory (a campus wide clean room facility) at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He has authored or co-authored over 120 journal papers, over 140 conference papers and conference abstracts, over 80 invited talks, and has been granted 34 patents. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and American Institute for Medical Biological Engineering. He also holds a visiting position at Shriners Hospital for Children/Massachusetts General Hospital.

His research interests include BioMEMS, Lab on a chip, nano-biotechnology, interfacing biology and engineering from molecular to tissue scale, and applications of semiconductor fabrication to biomedical engineering, all applied to solve biomedical problems. He has been involved in two startups that have licensed his technologies.

In addition to his own research group, and being part of other National Centers, he is the Principal Investigator (PI) on the National Institutes of Health Training Grant on Cancer Nanotechnology and also the PI on a National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship on Cellular and Molecular Mechanics and Bionanotechnology.

Dr. Bashir completed his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1992. From 1992-1998, he worked at National Semiconductor in the Analog/Mixed Signal Process Technology Development Group as Senior Engineering Manager.

 

Abhaya Datye, Ph.D.
Distinguished Regents Professor, Department of Chemical & Nuclear Engineering
University of New Mexico

Abhaya Datye, Ph.D.

Abhaya Datye, Ph.D., has been on the faculty at the University of New Mexico (UNM) since 1984 and presently serves as the undergraduate advisor for chemical engineering and formerly served as Associate Chair. He is also the Director of the graduate interdisciplinary program in Nanoscience and Microsystems, the first program at UNM to span three schools and colleges and now has active ties to the Business school. He serves as Director of the Center for Microengineered Materials (CMEM), a strategic research center at UNM that reports to the Vice President for Research. The CMEM serves as the focal point for nanomaterials research on campus and has hosted a National Science Foundation (NSF) site in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program since 1994.

His research interests are in heterogeneous catalysis, materials characterization and nanomaterials synthesis. His research group has pioneered the development of electron microscopy tools for the study of catalysts. By developing model catalysts for this work, his group has shown that the metal and oxide surfaces and interfaces in catalytic materials can be studied at near atomic resolution. His current work involves the synthesis of biorenewable chemicals, fundamental studies of catalyst sintering, alcohol reforming into H2 and synthesis of novel nanostructured heterogeneous catalysts. He leads the NSF Partnership for International Research and Education (PIRE) on Conversion of Biomass derived reactants into Fuels, Chemicals and Materials (a collaboration between faculty and researchers in the United States, Denmark, Germany, Netherlands and Finland). Dr. Datye has authored over 230 publications, two patents and has presented 100 invited lectures around the world. He was the Chair of the Gordon Research Conference on Catalysis in 2010.

Dr. Datye received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan in 1984.

 

B. Mark Evers, M.D.
Director of the Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, Professor and Vice Chair in the Department of Surgery
University of Kentucky

B. Mark Evers, M.D., was Professor and Robertson-Poth Distinguished Chair in General Surgery and the Director of the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) Sealy Center for Cancer Cell Biology. In May of 2009, Dr. Evers was recruited to the University of Kentucky as the Director of the Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, Professor and Vice Chair in the Department of Surgery and Director of the Oncology Service Line for UK HealthCare. Dr. Evers has authored over 210 peer-reviewed publications, over 62 reviews and book chapters and 251 abstracts.

Dr. Evers' research has been continuously funded from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the past 18 years. He is currently the Principal Investigator (PI) or Director for six externally funded studies, including a prestigious NIH Merit Award and a GI Cancer Specialized Programs Of Research Excellence (SPORE). At UTMB he was PI of the T32 training grant from 1997 to the time of his departure in 2009 in the Department of Surgery and was the Associate Director of a T32 in the Cancer Center. Dr. Evers has actively mentored over 70 students, residents, fellows, house staff, and junior faculty. Many of the junior faculty that he has mentored are faculty at various institutions across the country and have active, independent research laboratories. In addition, Dr. Evers has an active clinical practice that deals with surgical problems related to GI oncology, endocrinology and soft tissue tumors.

Dr. Evers is the Associate Editor for two major textbooks and is on the editorial board of four journals and recently completed tenure as a regular member of the Tumor and Microenvironment (TME) study section. He has also served in various leadership positions in national and international societies and is a past President of the Society of University Surgeons, the current President of its Foundation and Secretary of the Southern Surgical Association. He is a member of the American Board of Surgery, a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigators (ASCI) and was recently awarded the Flance-Karl Award from the American Surgical Association which is the highest research award bestowed upon an American surgeon.

Dr. Evers graduated from medical school at the University of Tennessee (AOA), completed his surgical training at the University of Louisville in 1988 and then performed a research fellowship in gastrointestinal physiology at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) in Galveston from 1988-1990.

 

Douglas Faller, M.D., Ph.D.
Director
Boston University/Boston Medical Center Cancer Center

Douglas V. Faller, Ph.D., M.D.

Douglas Faller, M.D., Ph.D., is the Director of the Boston University/Boston Medical Center Cancer Center. He is also Professor of Medicine, Biochemistry, Pediatrics, Microbiology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and also serves as Vice-Chairman of the Department of Medicine.

Dr. Faller's research efforts have focused on the role of viruses and oncogenic signaling in cancer and cell growth. His major emphasis has been on the translation of basic discoveries in these areas to clinical application. He is an inventor of multiple new technologies for the treatment of cancers, blood diseases, and other inherited disorders. Dr. Faller holds many patents for basic and translational medical discoveries, including novel targeted therapeutic approaches to viral-associated malignancies, oncogene-targeted therapeutics, small-molecule hematopoietic stimulants, and therapies for sickle cell disease and cystic fibrosis. Dr. Faller directs national and institutional clinical trials in oncology. He is the recipient of multiple awards and honors. Dr. Faller has over 250 research publications, spanning basic molecular biology and bioengineering to clinical studies in hematology and oncology.

Dr. Faller received his B.S from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, his M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his post-graduate residency and subspecialty training in Hematology and Oncology at the University of California San Francisco, Boston Children's Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School, where he was previously on the faculty in Medicine and Pediatrics.

 

Bennett B. Goldberg, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics and Founder and Director of the Center for Nanoscience and Nanobiotechnology
Boston University

Bennett B. Goldberg, Ph.D.

Bennett B. Goldberg, Ph.D., is a Professor of Physics, with joint appointments in Biomedical and Electrical and Computer Engineering. He is the founder and director of the Center for Nanoscience and Nanobiotechnology and former chair of the Department of Physics. At the Center, he directs the Boston University Nanomedicine Program. Dr. Goldberg is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, has been awarded a Sloan Foundation Fellowship and is a recipient of the Presidential Young Investigators Award. He has co-chaired a Special Nanophotonics Symposium, American Physical Society, and a nanoprobe symposium at the Materials Research Society Fall meeting; is a member of the organizing committee of the international Near-Field Optics conference; and chaired the nano-optics sub-committee of QELS. Dr. Goldberg has published more than 150 scholarly papers.

In addition to nanomedicine, his research interests are in the areas of nano-optics and sensing in semiconducting and biological systems. In biological systems, this includes sub-cellular imaging, and interferometric, label-free platforms for protein microarrays and single virus imaging. In materials, his research focuses on tip-enhanced near-field spectroscopy and microscopy of periodic and aperiodic plasmonic structures; subsurface solid immersion microscopy for Si inspection and quantum dot physics; and room and low-temperature near-field and high-resolution Raman spectroscopy of nanotubes, graphene and quantum dots.

Dr. Goldberg received a B.A. from Harvard University in 1982, and M.S. and Ph.D. in Physics from Brown University in 1984 and 1987 followed by a Bantrell Post-doc at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 

Andrew Kummel, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry/Biochemistry
University of California, San Diego

Andrew Kummel, Ph.D.

Andrew Kummel, Ph.D., is Professor of Chemistry/Biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), and Director of the UCSD Nano Medicine Lab. He is developing an automated system to evaluate surgical margins during breast conservation surgery intra-operatively. In other projects, Dr. Kummel's group is developing new materials for computer chips and chemical sensors based on atomic scale models and atomic scale assembly.

Dr. Kummel received his B.S. from Yale University and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford University.

 

Hai-Quan Mao, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Biomedical Engineering
Johns Hopkins University

Hai-Quan Mao, Ph.D.

Hai-Quan Mao is a professor in the departments of Materials Science and Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, and currently holds a joint appointment in the Translational Tissue Engineering Center at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. His research is focused on engineering novel nano-structured materials for nerve regeneration and therapeutic delivery. He is an affiliated faculty member of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. He received the Cygnus Award for Outstanding Work in Drug Delivery from the Controlled Release Society in 1997 for his research on gene delivery and received the Capsugel Awards for Outstanding Research in Innovative Aspects of Controlled Drug Release in 1998 and 2001 for his work on DNA vaccine delivery. He was the recipient of the Young Investigator Award at the National University of Singapore in 2002, and the NSF CAREER Award in 2008 for his work on artificial matrix for stem cell engineering. Mao’s research is focused on (1) creating nanofiber matrix platforms as an artificial stem cell niche to direct stem cell expansion or differentiation and (2) developing controlled release systems to deliver plasmid DNA, siRNA and other therapeutic agents. He has served on a number of scientific review panels including the National Science Foundation Biomaterials Program, NIH study sections on Enabling Technologies for Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine, and Gene and Drug Delivery, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and the New York State Stem Cell Program.

 

Robert Mattrey, M.D.
Professor of Radiology, Vice Chairman of The Department of Radiology
University of California, San Diego

Robert Mattrey, M.D.

Robert Mattrey, M.D., is a Professor of Radiology, Vice Chairman of The Department of Radiology, and Director of the In Vivo Cancer Molecular Imaging Center at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Mattrey's research is aimed at multi-modality imaging and therapy using cellular and molecular concepts. His major area of interest is ultrasound and ultrasound contrast media that uses microbubbles and nanoparticles. He was the first to describe the use of fluorocarbons as ultrasound contrast media, and has translated five agents developed in his laboratory from concept to the clinic with two reaching market approvals. His current research focus is to target tumor vascular and extravascular sites as well as enzymes for detection and therapy.

 

Ann M. Nardulli, Ph.D.
Professor, Molecular and Integrative Physiology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Ann M. Nardulli, Ph.D.

Since establishing her own laboratory in the Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, Ann M. Nardulli, Ph.D., has continued to pursue her interests in breast cancer biology and regulation of estrogen-responsive gene expression. Her laboratory demonstrated that binding of the estrogen receptor to discrete DNA binding sites alters receptor conformation, recruitment of regulatory proteins, and estrogen-responsive gene expression. These studies have helped to define how the estrogen-responsive genes in a single cell can be differentially regulated.

More recently, Dr. Nardulli's laboratory has identified novel protein networks that associate with the DNA-bound estrogen receptor and influence its activity. These estrogen receptor-associated proteins include oxidative stress response and DNA repair proteins, each of which alters expression of estrogen-responsive genes in human breast cancer cells. Taken together, these studies with cultured breast cancer cells, normal mammary tissue, and breast cancer tumors have provided evidence that oxidative stress response and DNA repair proteins are involved in the initiation, progression, and metastasis of breast cancer cells.

Dr. Nardulli has been an active participant in the scientific community. She has served on the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Molecular Endocrinology, Endocrine Reviews, and Gene Therapy and Molecular Biology. She has also served as a regular member of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Molecular & Cellular Endocrinology Study Section and as a member and chair of the U.S. Army Breast Cancer Research Program. Dr. Nardulli has participated as an ad hoc member of the U.S. Army Prostate Cancer Research Program, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, National Science Foundation, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and various other NIH Study Sections. Dr. Nardulli is currently co-PI on the Midwest Cancer Nanotechnology Center, Director of the University of Illinois Reproductive Biology Program, and a member of The Endocrine Society Advocacy and Public Outreach Core Committee.

Dr. Nardulli received her Ph.D. from the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she studied the synthesis and degradation of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer cells. She continued her postdoctoral work in Urbana where she focused on the interaction of the estrogen receptor with DNA.

 

Janet M. Oliver, Ph.D.
Regents' Professor of Pathology
University of New Mexico

Janet M. Oliver, Ph.D.

Dr. Janet M. Oliver, Ph.D., is Regents' Professor of Pathology at the University of New Mexico, PI/Director of the New Mexico Center for Spatiotemporal Modeling of Cell Signaling, and Associate Director for Partnerships and Faculty Development in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) -designated University of New Mexico Cancer Center. Dr. Oliver has held faculty appointments at the University of Connecticut Heath Center and at the University of New Mexico (UNM) Health Sciences Center. Her main research interest is in the integration of novel imaging probes and technologies with biochemistry and computational modeling to better understand and manipulate complex signaling pathways in immune and cancer cells.

As primary liaison from the UNM Cancer Center to the Nanoscience and Microsystems IGERT training program (A. Datye, Principal Investigator), the National Science Foundation/NCI co-funded precursor to the New Mexico Cancer Nanoscience Microsystems Training Center (NM CNTC), Dr. Oliver supported the formation of research teams that integrate cancer biology with nanotechnology to better understand, detect, and treat cancer. Made up of cancer biologists and clinicians from the UNM Health Sciences Center and physical and computational scientists and engineers from the UNM College of Arts and Sciences and School of Engineering and the Sandia and Los Alamos National Laboratories, these interdisciplinary teams provide outstanding mentors and research resources for the CNTC students and postdocs. Dr. Oliver has a career track record of over 160 peer-reviewed publications and over 140 cumulative years of grant support from National Institutes of Health, NCI, and the American Cancer Society.

Dr. Oliver received her B.Sc. (Hons) degree in Biochemistry at the Flinders University of South Australia, her Ph.D. in Biochemistry from London University and was a postdoc in Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School.

 

Denis Wirtz, Ph.D.
Theophilus Halley Smoot Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Whiting School of Engineering
Johns Hopkins University

Denis Wirtz, Ph.D.

Denis Wirtz, Ph.D., directs the Johns Hopkins Cancer Nanotechnology Training Center. He is the Theophilus Halley Smoot Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering in the Whiting School of Engineering. Dr. Wirtz studies the biophysical properties of healthy and diseased cells, including interactions between adjacent cells and the role of cellular architecture on nuclear shape and gene expression. Cell biophysics, single molecule manipulation, intracellular particle trafficking, instrument development, tissue engineering, and nanotechnology in biology and medicine are some of Dr. Wirtz' research interests.

Dr. Wirtz was elected as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for his contributions to cell micromechanics and cell adhesion. He also was distinguished for his development and application for particle tracking methods to probe the micromechanical properties of living cells in normal conditions and disease state. He is Associate Director of the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Director of the NCI-funded postdoctoral and pre-doctoral training programs in nanotechnology for cancer Medicine, and Director of the new NCI-funded Physical Sciences in Oncology Center. Dr. Wirtz is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Institute for Medical Biological Engineering. He joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 1994 and has joint appointments in the departments of Materials Science and Engineering and Oncology. He was a winner of the National Science Foundation's CAREER Award and the Whitaker Foundation Biomedical Engineering Foundation Award.

Dr. Wirtz earned his Engineering Physics degree at the Université Libre de Bruxelles in Belgium and M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at Stanford University.